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4 Tips For Building Your Self-Defense System


SIGMA 3

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The four tips for building your self-defense system will ensure that your system is ready when your life depends on it. There are many videos on YouTube® that one can find about the various aspects of self-defense. A growing body of work is on building active-shooter kits or bags, setting up body armor, or building a firearms range bag. My analysis of these presentations is that they fall short in telling the viewer about some fundamental aspects of building your firearms-related kit. These presentations assume that the viewer is already familiar with the fundamental elements of self-defense, CCW, and the law. Therefore, we will cover these essential aspects of building your system.

1. Familiarity with Your Self-Defense System

The most basic level of building a self-defense system with firearms is Familiarity. Familiarity requires training and experience. An important question to ask yourself is, how familiar are you with some firearm or tactical gear that interests you?

Moreover, becoming familiar with your self-defense system means to train repeatedly with it. If you do not regularly train with your equipment and gear, you will fail to employ your system in an emergency.

For example, how efficient are you at pulling out that AR pistol from your deployment gear bag in the trunk or back seat of your car during the mad-minute of violent contact with a  criminal? It is nice to be able to create a well-equipped active-shooter bag. It is quite another at being able to employ those tools in less than thirty seconds under duress. The accomplishment of this essential aspect of your system requires repeatedly training to use it in a stress-induced training environment.

2. Practicality of Employment of Your Self-Defense System

Your self-defense system should be built on the principle of practicality. Practicality will influence the kinds of gear that will become part of your system. Many aspects of urban survival and preparedness revolve around having tactical equipment. Unfortunately, many do not understand such gear’s purpose or how to use it properly within its designed purpose. Thus, a key question is whether or not a piece of equipment is practical for you. For example, if you do not understand how to use, wear, and set up body armor, you may want to consider a different option.

3. Accessibility of Your Self-Defense System

One of the more essential considerations for your system is accessibility in an emergency. Some people will recommend nicely outfitted bags or backpacks to be stored behind the seat or trunk box of their truck or in the trunk of their car. However, how accessible is that gear in an emergency?

There is a reason that law enforcement professionals carry rifles or shotguns in a rack in their cruisers and wear body armor under their uniforms. There is not enough time when you are being engaged with gunfire to fumble around with your gear. Therefore, ensure that your system is easily accessible in an emergency.

4. Other Considerations Regarding Your Self-Defense System

Additionally, there are many aspects to consider when preparing to defend yourself with your gear. These considerations are: understanding the mad minute and violence of action, the psychological effects of using deadly force, understanding the effects of weapons ammunition, and understanding the law and your rights to protect yourself.

A. Reacting to Contact

Finally, as you build your firearm-based system, you will need to be proficient in reacting to contact using your gear. In other words, you should be skilled at reacting to life-threatening situations when engaged by a criminal. Again, this means training regularly with your equipment. The U.S. Army has a saying, “train as you fight.” Thus, train with your gear as you would use it during a sudden, violent encounter. Therefore, use your gear in the training scenarios that will simulate situations that you are most likely to face.

B. The Mad Minute

Our previous article on staying safe this summer briefly mentioned the mad minute and the psychological aspects of combat. It is one thing to train yourself by shooting at paper targets and plywood cutouts. By contrast, it is quite another matter when shooting at an actual human being. In the mad minute, the violence of action will render you incapable of thinking through the situation if you are not mentally and physically prepared for such an encounter. Those that adjust quickly will be able to shoot, move, and communicate more effectively in a life-threatening situation. Thus, you must train in such a way that stress and surprise develop your reactions to violent encounters.

C. The Psychological Effects

The psychological effects of using deadly force against another human being will change you in ways that you will not understand. The leadership of the United States military continues to seek ways to mitigate the psychological effects of combat on soldiers. The taking of another person’s life should not be glorified or admired in any manner. Thus, your mental and emotional health will gain strength by understanding the psychological effects that you may cause yourself when preparing to use a firearm. Are you ready for that outcome?

D. The Law

The legal aspects are just as important as the others mentioned above. Despite how one may feel about the law, second amendment rights, or self-defense, the law governs how and when it is legal to defend yourself with a firearm.

As you build your system, it is imperative that your understanding of the law reflects how you will employ your gear in an emergency. If you know yourself, your equipment, and the law, you will increase your chances of successfully defending yourself in an emergency.

Final Thoughts

Your firearm-based self-defense system is an integral part of preparing for an emergency. There are cost-to-benefit considerations to think about when attempting to build such a system. The system that you create for yourself should be highly individualized. Furthermore, if you cannot afford the time or money to train regularly, it is an indicator that you should be focusing on the creation of your self-defense system in other areas until you can prepare adequately. Remember, there are many components to building a sound self-defense system. It will take time to create one, but it will be worth it when you need it in an emergency.

 

The post 4 Tips For Building Your Self-Defense System appeared first on SIGMA 3 Survival School.


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Headhunter

Posted

You talked about the psychological effects, and this is a very real problem for many people.

 

In Vietnam, I was a sniper in the 101st.  I am credited with 43 kills, officially, and based upon the wounds I inflicted on others, that total is more like 60-62.

 

The first time I squeezed a trigger on a man, and saw his head virtually explode, I wept like a baby.  By the end of my time there, my spotter and I made jokes about the patterns of blood spray.  Occasionally, I have dreams ... very bad dreams, indeed ... about my time "over there".  You can't kill another human without it having an effect on you.

 

I'm ready to do it, again (though I rather hoped that I wouldn't have, in my seventies).  But I don't look forward to it.  But in the current political/sociological conditions in America - with the threat posed to all of us by the Left and their more-than-willing tools - I rather suspect that I won't shed another tear.  Like I said, the killing of another human changes you, and eventually that change becomes permanent.

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Guest Skoocum

Posted

Thank you sir for your service and comments and although I never served in the Nam (just a bit too young at the time) but I had to register for the draft. I can honestly say that I do not know what I would have done - I was leaning toward enlisting since then I had a few more choices of the particular branch of the military offered with some billets open to me to gain some experience for jobs after the war. My parents wanted me to go to Canada. I was not too keen on that idea since I would have felt like a coward. 

 

That decision was ultimately made for me as Nixon ended the draft and the war soon thereafter. Then I developed a serious medical condition at age 18 and if I would have gone in I suspect that I would have been medically discharged shortly thereafter. I accepted that as God's will for me at the time. I WAS NOT an anti-war protester by any means and over the years I have come to greatly admire and respect any man or woman who bravely served this country. I was ashamed of being an American and angered when I saw how our returning vets were treated upon reentry into this once great country. That told me a lot about how far the subversives had penetrated into our social fabric.

 

I became a licensed clinical child psychologist and personally witnessed and treated young victims of violence and abuse in homes and communities and the wounds were deep. I can understand (to some degree) what you experienced in taking lives in a time of war. They were all scarred by their experiences. I have much empathy and compassion for you - sir. 

 

I have always believed that God (also the Constitution) gives us the right to defend and protect ourselves (or loved ones, or property) whenever our lives or such are seriously threatened by criminal reprobates or thugs. I, too would most likely hesitate (hopefully for not too long) before having to kill somebody who was a personal threat to me and if I believed my life was in danger. Now, if a stranger entered my home unwelcomed - assuming their intent was to do me or my family harm - then he/she would be painted and shot without any flinching on my part whatsoever.

 

I guess my point is that many of the negative feelings that any person would feel after the taking of another's life in a just and legal manner would be mitigated by that the fact that you were defending a life while another person (perp) did not care. Having the moral high ground is crucial. Your situation in Nam placed you and your brothers in similar situations (in a time of war) where you also had to defend yourselves or you would be killed. You were not illegally "murdering VC but killing to defend yourselves and win a war that the politicians essentially made unwinnable. God bless you my good man and your brothers both alive and deceased - your trauma was for us - for me and that still means a HUGE something to real Americans. 

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Guest Fireeagle

Posted

On 7/1/2020 at 5:15 PM, Headhunter said:

You talked about the psychological effects, and this is a very real problem for many people.

 

In Vietnam, I was a sniper in the 101st.  I am credited with 43 kills, officially, and based upon the wounds I inflicted on others, that total is more like 60-62.

 

The first time I squeezed a trigger on a man, and saw his head virtually explode, I wept like a baby.  By the end of my time there, my spotter and I made jokes about the patterns of blood spray.  Occasionally, I have dreams ... very bad dreams, indeed ... about my time "over there".  You can't kill another human without it having an effect on you.

 

I'm ready to do it, again (though I rather hoped that I wouldn't have, in my seventies).  But I don't look forward to it.  But in the current political/sociological conditions in America - with the threat posed to all of us by the Left and their more-than-willing tools - I rather suspect that I won't shed another tear.  Like I said, the killing of another human changes you, and eventually that change becomes permanent.

Headhunter thank you for your service in Nam.  I’m sure you saved a ton of lives as a sniper. A true hero.  
 

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Headhunter

Posted

51 minutes ago, [email protected] said:

Headhunter thank you for your service in Nam.  I’m sure you saved a ton of lives as a sniper. A true hero.  
 

 

Thank you, sir.  It was my honor to serve.

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This is a great article, but I think that it is important to have a well rounded self defense system. If you rely only on firearms for protection what happens when you run out of ammo, your weapon malfunctions, or your attacker gets the drop on you. Then you may have to rely on a knife, an improvised weapon, or even your bare hands to defend yourself. I think the same way about relying only on some type of martial arts training to defend yourself. Hands and feet are no match for a gun fight. An opponent with a knife can close the distance with you from 15 feet away in a couple of seconds. That is not enough time for most people to pull a gun, get it into position and aim it. My suggestion is to try and include firearms training, unarmed training, and training with a baton or stick. There is no training regimen to prepare for every possibility, but being well rounded covers a lot of the bases. 

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