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Survival Radio Frequencies and Amateur Radio Bands

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Comm security comes in two fold areas. 1st is signal strength. Stopping from having folks listen in, or jam by over powering. Most HT(handie-talkies) have different power settings, use the lower setting. When carrying/using them, use your body to shield the signal from going behind you and face your receiver. 2nd is to use COMSEC. Use code words, different frequencies (but use the above for interoperability), and make agreements to use different frequencies when communicating with teams adjacent to you. There's a lot more to it, cause each part goes in considerable depth.

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That all sounds simple enough, my follow up question will be , What, if any, equipment do you or would you recommend for a unit ? That is, given that only non military comms equipment are the most likely source for outfitting a unit, is there a specific set up that is more reliable, with good range and reliability along with weather resistance ?

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If you want to truly answer your own question Greg then my answer will be first thing you need top do is get at least your HAM license because it will open your eyes to exactly what radio can and cannot do.

 

Things like beam antennas with 2m HT radios at .1 watt are basically what small groups need for semi discrete communication like a patrol to base.

 

Second you have to break down comms to short, medium ( out to 30-50 miles) and long range. Learn about NVIS which is as close to DF proof as it gets, learn about long wire and directional antennas as well as QRP which is transmitting around the world on Very Low Power (QRP) Its an art not a science

 

Everyone wants to be a sniper, be a super secret ninja but no one wants to learn how to communicate which is a huge issue

 

Radio Master did a long post about the "militia" who took over the refuge in Or and detailed exactly how fukked up they were especially with comms gear. Literally could not talk 50 yards to each other. There was a lot there but suffice to say the whole mob was ate up from the word go.

 

Start reading here

http://quietsurvivalist.com/communication-library-preppers/

 

Then here

http://quietsurvivalist.com/radio-communication-preppers/

 

Look at the links to other pages which concentrate on just comms

 

Here

http://quietsurvivalist.com/signals-intelligence-prepping/

 

And then here

 

http://quietsurvivalist.com/range-of-frsgmrs-radios/

 

The jist of this reply is to tell you you cant replace knowledge with a box of junk Chinese gear no matter how cheap it is. Shoot, move and communicate are the rules of three for any type op.

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As a Commo Sergeant, the key is to start small. Learn proper technique, learn how radios work, then start into learning COMSEC.

 

There is a lot to it, so decide now if you want to learn the basic squad/team level commo or if you want to be the commo OIC/NCOIC.

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EVERY person needs to be up to at least the basic Technician level on comes, preferably General. As a minimum , functioning level. A standard if you will. Team OIC/NCOIC should be an Extra. There is just to much to know and every person should have the training.

 

4 years as a grunt 20 years ago doesn't cut it, it requires knowledge above and beyond the Chinese HT level to operate effectively

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Greg

 

You asked about specific gear

 

Squad/Team radios Motorola DTR650 900 Mhz spread spectrum hand helds- very difficult to DF and impossible to scan without a heavy budget and they have to be looking for that freq range to find it. These are rare in most areas so are about as secure as you will get legally. Also, each radio has to be part of your network so other radios not belonging to your group cant listen in.

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Gentlemen. I thank you for all this great info. I think that my best shot at landing a spot in a squad is to learn COMSEC as fast as I can the move into a fully functioning OIC/NCOIC . I will begin researching and buying comms equipment . But that will take some time. My 3rd tactical rifle set me back a few dollars . As a green horn , I did not anticipate comms . Big mistake on my part .

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If you want to truly answer your own question Greg then my answer will be first thing you need top do is get at least your HAM license because it will open your eyes to exactly what radio can and cannot do.

 

Things like beam antennas with 2m HT radios at .1 watt are basically what small groups need for semi discrete communication like a patrol to base.

 

Second you have to break down comms to short, medium ( out to 30-50 miles) and long range. Learn about NVIS which is as close to DF proof as it gets, learn about long wire and directional antennas as well as QRP which is transmitting around the world on Very Low Power (QRP) Its an art not a science

 

Everyone wants to be a sniper, be a super secret ninja but no one wants to learn how to communicate which is a huge issue

 

Radio Master did a long post about the "militia" who took over the refuge in Or and detailed exactly how fukked up they were especially with comms gear. Literally could not talk 50 yards to each other. There was a lot there but suffice to say the whole mob was ate up from the word go.

 

Start reading here

http://quietsurvivalist.com/communication-library-preppers/

 

Then here

http://quietsurvivalist.com/radio-communication-preppers/

 

Look at the links to other pages which concentrate on just comms

 

Here

http://quietsurvivalist.com/signals-intelligence-prepping/

 

And then here

 

http://quietsurvivalist.com/range-of-frsgmrs-radios/

 

The jist of this reply is to tell you you cant replace knowledge with a box of junk Chinese gear no matter how cheap it is. Shoot, move and communicate are the rules of three for any type op.

Looks like I have a load ahead of me , best get started .

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If it were me...............Get at least your General ham license FIRST

 

After buying the books , wait on the gear on the threads I linked above .

 

The next thing I would do is watch Ebay or Hamfest swap meets for a pair of Yeasu VX-7 radios, download the manual and wipe the memories clean

 

Set up 1 on the 6m and 222Mhz band with the appropriate antennas, the other with your local Emergency Services Freqs on the 2m/440 bands.

 

Get the AA battery trays, 12 volt chargers and the 110 volt fast charger for both

 

Then Get a Panasonic Tough Book Lap top case, and start with new boards and build a Digital sytem for the 2m and HF radio freqs

 

Go on the Elecraft web page and buy the KX3with all options and filters, and cables especially to connect to the Panasonic.

 

You will be a one stop shop for communications, both internal to your team and monitoring outside comms

 

This is of course in addition to a high quality digital scanner and the Motorola DTR650 I posted above. Before you or anyone buys anything please talk to me, you can throw a bunch of money away and not realize it until you have a cabinet full of junk

 

Be prepared for sticker shock, you will drop close to 10K for a complete setup and that's if you manage to not buy anything you don't need

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For anyone that uses the

 

FTBVX8

Yaesu VX-8 programming software to manage memories in the FM handheld transceiver.

 

This is a converted and compatible file based off the

PATRIOT_2016A.csv data file (CSV) commonly used in CHIRP

.vx8 File

 

 

 

 

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