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     Just wanted to share something with other believers in Christ, which can be helpful, and which you will not likely hear in church, as so many have veered from the true Word, that is, meanings.

     Most parishioners are told, 'Have faith' and 'Don't let doubts and unbelief into your mind'. They also teach that believers always love reading the Bible, that true believers never have the thought or will to want to get away from God, that if they do, then they were never really converted to Christ to begin with.

     Those are merely religious axioms and are far from the truth, much displaced from human reality and are not consistent with God's knowledge.

     The original apostles who walked with Jesus Christ while He ministered had doubts and unbelief, though they were eye witnesses to the miracles and teaching (Matthew 17:14-21), and had been empowered to do what Jesus did (Matthew 10:1).

     After the resurrection, once Christ appeared to the disciples, they didn't at first believe it was Him, and thought that Mary Magdalene, who first saw Him, was seeing things or telling tales when she told them she'd seen the Lord (Luke 24:1-11).

     To make ourselves believe without doubts is to attempt to attain to belief by human effort, which is works, and of no account concerning faith > Romans 11:6, Galatians 2:16, Zechariah 4:6, Hosea 1:7, Ephesians 2:8,9.

     The mind is part flesh, and partly spiritual, neither of which can be fully reigned in to the Lord's ways by strictly human effort > Romans 10:2,3.

     The apostle Paul tells us in his writings that it is impossible for the human side of us to be perfect or even fully reliable, and this he wrote decades after his conversion > Romans 7:12-25.

     Romans 14:23 shows that anything not of faith is sin. Can we have faith and doubts or unbelief at the same time? The answer is a resounding yes, explained in two ways: a saying of John Wayne was "Courage is being afraid but saddling up anyway". That would explain St. Peter when he got out of the boat to walk on the water to go to Jesus; he was surely afraid at least some, but he exercised what faith in Christ he had.

     A man took his epilectic child to be healed of Jesus, and had some unbelief that he would or could be healed. But he exercised what faith he had and asked the Lord to help be rid of his element of unbelief, and his little boy was healed (Mark 9:17-27).

     Likewise, we need to admit to ourselves and to God when we have doubts and unbelief, asking Him to help rid us of it.

     He rids us of it by the Holy Ghost, which teaches, comforts and reproves (John 14:11,16,26, 16:13,14).

     What about if or when we just want to forget about God due to persecution or terrible burdens? Does that mean we never really had Christ in our hearts? No, it doesn't.

     Jonah tried escaping his calling, but did finally submit to the will of, what, others? No, to God.

     Another mighty prophet once wanted to be estranged from God as well, due to persecution and probably depression, even thinking that God had deceived him. He admitted it to God and after a time resumed the Walk (Jeremiah 20:1,2,7-18).

     There is one person whom the Lord tells, inputs into the mind and heart what any given believer is to do, or not to do. That person is each believer, not another > I Kings 13:1,2,14-30.

 

     Note also that the Lord works with us even if we're overtaken in a fault, a sin, helping us to overcome. Everyone has issues. The problem is if we refuse to change to His ways.

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1 hour ago, Todd A. Slee said:

     Just wanted to share something with other believers in Christ, which can be helpful, and which you will not likely hear in church, as so many have veered from the true Word, that is, meanings.

     Most parishioners are told, 'Have faith' and 'Don't let doubts and unbelief into your mind'. They also teach that believers always love reading the Bible, that true believers never have the thought or will to want to get away from God, that if they do, then they were never really converted to Christ to begin with.

     Those are merely religious axioms and are far from the truth, much displaced from human reality and are not consistent with God's knowledge.

     The original apostles who walked with Jesus Christ while He ministered had doubts and unbelief, though they were eye witnesses to the miracles and teaching (Matthew 17:14-21), and had been empowered to do what Jesus did (Matthew 10:1).

     After the resurrection, once Christ appeared to the disciples, they didn't at first believe it was Him, and thought that Mary Magdalene, who first saw Him, was seeing things or telling tales when she told them she'd seen the Lord (Luke 24:1-11).

     To make ourselves believe without doubts is to attempt to attain to belief by human effort, which is works, and of no account concerning faith > Romans 11:6, Galatians 2:16, Zechariah 4:6, Hosea 1:7, Ephesians 2:8,9.

     The mind is part flesh, and partly spiritual, neither of which can be fully reigned in to the Lord's ways by strictly human effort > Romans 10:2,3.

     The apostle Paul tells us in his writings that it is impossible for the human side of us to be perfect or even fully reliable, and this he wrote decades after his conversion > Romans 7:12-25.

     Romans 14:23 shows that anything not of faith is sin. Can we have faith and doubts or unbelief at the same time? The answer is a resounding yes, explained in two ways: a saying of John Wayne was "Courage is being afraid but saddling up anyway". That would explain St. Peter when he got out of the boat to walk on the water to go to Jesus; he was surely afraid at least some, but he exercised what faith in Christ he had.

     A man took his epilectic child to be healed of Jesus, and had some unbelief that he would or could be healed. But he exercised what faith he had and asked the Lord to help be rid of his element of unbelief, and his little boy was healed (Mark 9:17-27).

     Likewise, we need to admit to ourselves and to God when we have doubts and unbelief, asking Him to help rid us of it.

     He rids us of it by the Holy Ghost, which teaches, comforts and reproves (John 14:11,16,26, 16:13,14).

     What about if or when we just want to forget about God due to persecution or terrible burdens? Does that mean we never really had Christ in our hearts? No, it doesn't.

     Jonah tried escaping his calling, but did finally submit to the will of, what, others? No, to God.

     Another mighty prophet once wanted to be estranged from God as well, due to persecution and probably depression, even thinking that God had deceived him. He admitted it to God and after a time resumed the Walk (Jeremiah 20:1,2,7-18).

     There is one person whom the Lord tells, inputs into the mind and heart what any given believer is to do, or not to do. That person is each believer, not another > I Kings 13:1,2,14-30.

 

     Note also that the Lord works with us even if we're overtaken in a fault, a sin, helping us to overcome. Everyone has issues. The problem is if we refuse to change to His ways.

Also we must not listen to the virtue signallers, we are God's Temple and we mustn't forget that. Also these satanic political leaders are seeking to disgrace that truth.

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