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Doug1943

The Left's New Narrative: It's the White Racists' Fault!

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Here's the latest essay from Diane Ravitch, who runs a leftwing pro-government-schools blog. This will be the new explanation by the Left for the riots.

 

[SOURCE: http://dianeravitch.net/2020/06/04/what-is-the-bougaloo-movement/]

 

There has been persistent speculation that peaceful protests against racism and police brutality may have been infiltrated by white provocateurs.

The members of this movement have attracted attention.

The police in Las Vegas arrested three white men and charged them with terrorism.

Three Nevada men with ties to a loose movement of right-wing extremists advocating the overthrow of the U.S. government have been arrested on terrorism-related charges in what authorities say was a conspiracy to spark violence during recent protests in Las Vegas.

Federal prosecutors say the three white men with U.S. military experience are accused of conspiring to carry out a plan that began in April in conjunction with protests to reopen businesses closed because of the coronavirus.

More recently, they sought to capitalize on protests over the death of George Floyd, a black man who died in Minneapolis after a white officer pressed his knee into his neck for several minutes even after he stopped moving and pleading for air, prosecutors said.

The three men were arrested Saturday on the way to a protest in downtown Las Vegas after filling gas cans at a parking lot and making Molotov cocktails in glass bottles, according to a copy of the criminal complaint obtained by The Associated Press.

A 25-year-old white man was arrested for arson in Nashville after setting a fire at the city’s historic Courthouse. A white man dressed in black and wearing a gas mask smashed windows in Minneapolis, where he methodically used a hammer to break every window in an Autozone store, then slipped away.

Were they and others part of the so-called “Bougaloo Movement” of rightwing anarchists?

This is what Wikipedia says about them.

The boogaloo movement, members of which are often referred to as boogaloo boys or boogaloo bois, is a loosely organized American far-right extremist movement.[3][4][5] Members of the boogaloo movement say they are preparing for a coming second American Civil War, which they call the “boogaloo”.[3][6] Members use the term to refer to violent uprisings against the federal government or left-wing political opponents, often anticipated to follow government confiscation of firearms.[1][7]

The movement consists of anti-government and anti-law enforcement groups, as well as white supremacist groups who specifically believe the unrest will be a race war.[3][1][7] Groups in the boogaloo movement primarily organize online (particularly on Facebook), but have appeared at in-person events including the 2020 United States anti-lockdown protests and the May 2020 George Floyd protests, often identified by their attire of Hawaiian shirts and military fatigues.[1][8][9]…

Members of boogaloo groups typically believe in accelerationism, and support any action that will speed impending civil war and eventually the collapse of society.[4][6] According to The Economist, to this end boogaloo group members have supported the “spreading of disinformation and conspiracy theories, attacks on infrastructure (such as that on New York’s 311 line) and lone-wolf terrorism.”[4] Some boogaloo groups are also white supremacist and specifically believe that the “boogaloo” will be a race war,[3][1][7] but there are others that condemn racism.[13] Attempts by some elements of the Boogaloo movement to support anti-racist groups, such as Black Lives Matter, have been met with wariness and skepticism….[14]

Extremism researchers first took notice of the word “boogaloo” being used in the context of the boogaloo movement in 2019, when they observed it being used among fringe groups including militias, gun rights movements, and white supremacist groups.[1] This usage of the term is believed to have originated on the fringe imageboard website 4chan, where it was often accompanied by references to “racewar” and “dotr” (day of the rope, a neo-Nazi reference to a fantasy involving murdering what the posters view to be “race traitors”).[1][6] Researchers from the Network Contagion Research Institute (NCRI) found that the usage of the term “boogaloo” increased by 50% on Facebook and Twitter in the last months of 2019 and into early 2020. They attribute surges in popularity to a viral incident in November 2019, when a military veteran posted content mentioning the boogaloo on Instagram during a standoff with police, and to the December 2019 impeachment of Donald Trump.[1][2] The boogaloo movement experienced a further surge in popularity following the lockdowns that were implemented to try to slow the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, and the Tech Transparency Project observed that the boogaloo groups appeared to be encouraged by President Trump’s tweets about “liberating” states under lockdown.[3][7][19]


You can get a lot further in life with a kind word and a gun, than with a kind word alone.

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Guest Bumblebee

In general one should always be careful of gaining bad publicity. 

 

Riots are generally remembered badly. The issues that started the riots are often forgotten in the face of the destruction caused by the riot. You don’t  necessarily want to be lumped in with that. 

 

It it would be a great time to start recruiting though. 

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21 minutes ago, Bumblebee said:

In general one should always be careful of gaining bad publicity. 

 

Riots are generally remembered badly. The issues that started the riots are often forgotten in the face of the destruction caused by the riot. You don’t  necessarily want to be lumped in with that. 

 

It it would be a great time to start recruiting though. 

Yes, this is true ... IF you basically think your country's pretty good. But a large, and growing, section of American society don't believe that. They think it's fundamentally rotten, and want to destroy it.

 

Quote

A Morning Consult poll conducted on May 31 and June 1 — several days after demonstrations began in protest over Floyd’s killing at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer who held a knee to Floyd’s neck for nearly 9 minutes — finds that 54 percent of Americans either strongly support or somewhat support the protests that are going on. Conversely, just 22 percent say they somewhat oppose or strongly oppose the demonstrations.

They'll be a wee bit embarrassed about the looting -- not about the violence -- but will rationalize it away: the Left has a stock explanation in their desk drawer: it begins  .... " The REAL _______ is capitalism."  (Fill in the blank with whatever atrocity has just happened: looting, mass terrorism, rape, etc.  Look, these people -- their ancestors -- rationalized Joseph Stalin. Gulags? Firing squads?  All a pack of lies.

They will rationalize anything.

 

Here's an example: https://truthout.org/articles/this-is-what-a-revolution-looks-like/

 

=============================================================================================================================================================

This Is What a Revolution Looks Like

Protesters demonstrate over the death of George Floyd, by a Minneapolis police officer, at a rally on May 30, 2020, in Washington, D.C. Protesters demonstrate over the police-perpetrated killing of George Floyd at a rally on May 30, 2020, in Washington, D.C. Jose Luis Magana / AFP via Getty Images
By
William Rivers Pitt,
Published
June 1, 2020
There has never been a weekend in the U.S. quite like the one we just experienced.

Many comparisons of this moment have been made to the fury that boiled over in 1968 after the murder of Martin Luther King Jr., and to the “Days of Rage,” the anti-war civil unrest that gripped Chicago in October of 1969. Some have pointed to the “Red Summer” of 1919 as an apt comparison, when a wave of racist violence washed over the nation as it grappled with the ravages of the Spanish flu pandemic.

Nothing in our history, however, squares entirely with the events now before us. Another lethal pandemic, this one still in its beginnings, has chewed through the illusions of strength this nation has used for decades to paper over its glaring inadequacies. Those very insufficiencies helped give rise to a pretender tyrant of a president, a one-man failed state who rages against the dying of his own feeble light even as he hides in the White House bunker from the consequences of his own gross derelictions.

 

Thanks to the advent of the social media age, nearly all of this has been recorded and spread far and wide. The violence of the white supremacist police state, a truth centuries in the making, has been exposed once again. This time, there was no retreat back into how it has always been, no slow fade from the news cycle. This time, it is in the streets with fists and voices raised, and no end in sight.

George Floyd died under the knee of a police officer with a notorious record of violence. A 17-year-old woman captured this murder on film, and within days, the whole world was watching. As actor Will Smith told Late Show host Stephen Colbert in 2016, “Racism isn’t getting worse. It’s getting filmed.”

In Minneapolis, Louisville, Washington, D.C., New York City, Boston, Chicago, Atlanta, Birmingham, Sioux Falls, Sacramento, Oklahoma City, Cleveland, Murfreesboro, Long Beach, Detroit, Denver, Philadelphia, Seattle, Dallas, Milwaukee and more, the people have risen. More than 40 cities in at least 24 states have borne witness to peaceful protests and fiery uprisings in equal measure.

The violence of the white supremacist police state, a truth centuries in the making, has been exposed once again.

The smashed windows and the fires, of course, get most of the press attention, and have drawn the grateful ire of those who would distract us from the reasons this has all erupted in the first place. There is growing evidence that some on the extreme right are attempting to co-opt some of the chaos toward their own ends, as they seek to harm communities of color and spark a racial civil war.

Far too much media attention is being lavished upon “looting”: Images of citizens from all racial backgrounds taking food, toiletries and other goods from stores amid the chaos have dominated the news cycles, threatening to bury the story at the heart of the matter.

But the coverage of this development fails to acknowledge the actual context: millions of people enduring massive economic disruption amid COVID-19 who are out of work and out of money. I speak of the millions of people who have suffered a lifetime of menace from the police and whose immediate desperation makes no purchase on the conscience of men like Mitch McConnell, who has balked at providing further relief to them because he does not see doing so as ideologically sound.

What relief that has been provided came in the guise of a now long-gone $1,200 payment that many who needed it most never saw, while the trillions of dollars earmarked for relief more than two months ago was plundered by wealthy corporations and friends of Donald Trump.

The dead were looted from us all by a racist police state that now has reacted with unrestrained violence against the people they are sworn to protect.

Who, then, are the true looters here?

There is always another microwave or television to put on the shelf of a store. There will never, ever, be another George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Eric Garner, Atatiana Jefferson, Botham Jean, Sandra Bland, Tamir Rice, Philando Castile, Tanisha Anderson, Michael Brown or Freddie Gray.

The dead were looted from us all by a racist police state that now has reacted with unrestrained violence against the people they are sworn to protect.

In Minneapolis, a woman standing peacefully on her own porch is fired upon by battle-armored police.

In New York City, a police officer pulls down the COVID mask of a young Black man who has his arms raised to pepper spray him in the face.

In Grand Rapids, a lone and unarmed protester is maced and shot in the face with a tear gas cannister by police.

In Atlanta, police smash the windows of a car containing a Black couple, haul them bodily from the vehicle, and taze them.

Also in Minneapolis, Vice News reporter Michael Adams is pepper sprayed by police as he lays on the ground in full compliance with orders. The violence against this reporter was echoed all across the country as journalists were viciously targeted by police.

Video footage of scenes like this has been piling up like the pallets of bricks that are mysteriously appearing at protest locations with no construction zones in sight.

Either these out-of-control violent cops don’t know that phones come with cameras now, or they simply don’t care. That latter possibility — nay, probability — is the deeply disquieting rub.

This is a fulcrum moment for the nation, one that could tilt either way.

A great many people are leaning hard into the nexus of change that has exploded before us due to a most lethal confluence of reasons: More than 100,000 dead and more than 40 million unemployed in an out-of-control pandemic presided over by a monster president even as Black men are slaughtered by cops in the name of the white power state, and oh by the way, the ocean is still coming.

The police, in many places, are leaning back with an arsenal of violent intent. The extreme ferocity of the police reaction is prima facie evidence of a state willing to commit virtually any atrocity in the defense of the racist status quo.

In response, we need to keep leaning. If you can, get out in the street with the protesters, or start your own small one where you live. If the streets are not possible for you, do what you can to stand in support, because everything counts. There are many ways to stand and fight in this moment of truth.

This is a fulcrum moment for the nation, one that could tilt either way. Either we secure a measure of justice through sustained effort, or the authoritarian pushback that has already begun will hurl us down into a darkness as yet uncomprehended should we weaken or stagger.

We must not. “Someday” is now. We can only write a better future if we are true to each other, to ourselves, and to the legion of victims who cry for justice from beyond this vale of fathomless sorrow.


You can get a lot further in life with a kind word and a gun, than with a kind word alone.

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Guest Bumblebee
Posted (edited)

@ Doug1943  That’s all well and good, but the question that needs to be asked is could the militia survive the after effects of being associated with such violence while currently being held in such poor public opinion?

 

Its 2020 and people still associate the militia with the Oklahoma City bombing. 

 

History is written and remembered by people that play to their own narratives and it would be a tough sale to have the militia remembered well within these riots. 

 

Violence can be impactful but is it the impact we want to make when the risk significantly outweighs the reward? 

 

Perhaps now would be a good time to start pushing an appropriate narrative. The site hosts blogs but it seems only One or two are putting things out that could be useful. 

 

We could be making articles of our own that people can cross post on other sites to help manage the narrative. 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Bumblebee

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Not  sure what you mean here.

 

The militia movement is scattered and not well organized, so something may have happened that I don't know about  but ... I don't think any militia people are involved in these riots.

There are some cases of armed self-defense, and the armed self-defenders look militia-y ... bearded men with AR15s and similar, although they don't seem to have given much thought to

how they dress ... but I haven't heard of the militia being involved even in defense. Both the Oathkeepers and the Three Percenters Original have made sensible statements.

 

But now is the time to say to the conservative movement ... it's only going to get worse. So buy that AR15, and check out your local militia. We ought to be posting this message, with this

website's URL, everywhere that there are conservative readers. Now is the time for the militia movement to move into the mainstream of the conservative movement, and into closer contact with their local community. 

 

It's not abstract 'public opinion' that we can change, but

---- (1) the opinion of those who share our basic assumptions, ie other conservatives, and

---- (2) the opinion of people who are our neighbors, whom we can meet while defending our community.

We will always face the bias of the mass media.

 

Of course, right now it's especially important to avoid provocateurs who will try to get  the movement involved in unnecessary armed clashes with the rioters.


You can get a lot further in life with a kind word and a gun, than with a kind word alone.

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Guest Bumblebee

@ Doug1943

I think we misunderstood each other lol. 

 

My first comment was implying that we shouldn’t join the rioters because it would give us bad publicity. 

 

I believe we’re actually in agreement. 

 

We could start moving out into other internet communities but we’d need more to give them. 

 

Content that can be cross posted, much like how you like to share articles, is extremely useful in generating viewers which turn into followers/users.  

 

But we’d really need to beef up that side of things. 

 

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@Bumblebee ... yes, I think we do agree.  We definitely don't want to be among the rioters ... nor, if something similar happened to one of our people, should we respond by rioting. Angry and militant, yes but peaceful and law-abiding.  And ... a more difficult point for some people to grasp ... neither do we want to be seen as, or to be,  anti-government, ie. anti-police as such.  We have to have police -- including a national secret police like the FBI -- that's just the price we pay for being human, and living in a large complex society. And there will always be people among the police who shouldn't be there -- who get "badge heavy" as it's sometimes called by the police themselves, even when they're not dealing daily with the sort of human garbage who inhabit the inner cities.

 

Actually, the real problem is not the George Lloyd cases -- policemen who act unprofessionally -- but policemen who may be utterly professional but who are following the orders of their superiors -- the 'Deep State' as it's sometimes called -- as we saw at Ruby Ridge, Waco, and with Duncan Lemp. (Even though a government review did strongly criticize the orders given at Ruby Ridge, where the 'rules of engagement' were changed, from 'shoot anyone threatening the lives of your officers' to 'shoot anyone carrying a weapon'  (not the exact words but that was the essence).  It's the main problem we have to deal with ... not the occasional policeman who oversteps the mark.

 

Right now, the only tactical issue to be decided -- and it's not something that can be pronounced upon in detail from above -- is this one: what role, if any, should local militia play in defending lives and property where the forces of the state fall short?  My instinct is to be very cautious here, especially given what I believe to be the relatively unsophisticated state of many local militia groups right now. I may be wrong about this, but I get the impression that a lot people on our side don't understand the law (which includes not just what's written on  paper but how it's likely to be interpreted by the local judges and juries).  I can see someone on our side acting morally in an absolutely justified manner, shooting a looter, and then getting charged with manslaughter and sent away for five years.

 

People read about the Joe Horn case and think that was true in his part of Texas twelve years ago, will be true in Milwaukee today. Not so. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Horn_shooting_controversy]

Everyone should read that Wiki article very closely, especially the last couple of paragraphs: you can see that even then, and even in Texas, the idea that if you're white, and you shoot someone who is not white, you're automatically guilty, was beginning to gain ground.

 

 


You can get a lot further in life with a kind word and a gun, than with a kind word alone.

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20 hours ago, Doug1943 said:

Yes, this is true ... IF you basically think your country's pretty good. But a large, and growing, section of American society don't believe that. They think it's fundamentally rotten, and want to destroy it.

 

They'll be a wee bit embarrassed about the looting -- not about the violence -- but will rationalize it away: the Left has a stock explanation in their desk drawer: it begins  .... " The REAL _______ is capitalism."  (Fill in the blank with whatever atrocity has just happened: looting, mass terrorism, rape, etc.  Look, these people -- their ancestors -- rationalized Joseph Stalin. Gulags? Firing squads?  All a pack of lies.

They will rationalize anything.

 

Here's an example: https://truthout.org/articles/this-is-what-a-revolution-looks-like/

 

=============================================================================================================================================================

This Is What a Revolution Looks Like

Protesters demonstrate over the death of George Floyd, by a Minneapolis police officer, at a rally on May 30, 2020, in Washington, D.C. Protesters demonstrate over the police-perpetrated killing of George Floyd at a rally on May 30, 2020, in Washington, D.C. Jose Luis Magana / AFP via Getty Images
By
William Rivers Pitt,
Published
June 1, 2020
There has never been a weekend in the U.S. quite like the one we just experienced.

Many comparisons of this moment have been made to the fury that boiled over in 1968 after the murder of Martin Luther King Jr., and to the “Days of Rage,” the anti-war civil unrest that gripped Chicago in October of 1969. Some have pointed to the “Red Summer” of 1919 as an apt comparison, when a wave of racist violence washed over the nation as it grappled with the ravages of the Spanish flu pandemic.

Nothing in our history, however, squares entirely with the events now before us. Another lethal pandemic, this one still in its beginnings, has chewed through the illusions of strength this nation has used for decades to paper over its glaring inadequacies. Those very insufficiencies helped give rise to a pretender tyrant of a president, a one-man failed state who rages against the dying of his own feeble light even as he hides in the White House bunker from the consequences of his own gross derelictions.

 

Thanks to the advent of the social media age, nearly all of this has been recorded and spread far and wide. The violence of the white supremacist police state, a truth centuries in the making, has been exposed once again. This time, there was no retreat back into how it has always been, no slow fade from the news cycle. This time, it is in the streets with fists and voices raised, and no end in sight.

George Floyd died under the knee of a police officer with a notorious record of violence. A 17-year-old woman captured this murder on film, and within days, the whole world was watching. As actor Will Smith told Late Show host Stephen Colbert in 2016, “Racism isn’t getting worse. It’s getting filmed.”

In Minneapolis, Louisville, Washington, D.C., New York City, Boston, Chicago, Atlanta, Birmingham, Sioux Falls, Sacramento, Oklahoma City, Cleveland, Murfreesboro, Long Beach, Detroit, Denver, Philadelphia, Seattle, Dallas, Milwaukee and more, the people have risen. More than 40 cities in at least 24 states have borne witness to peaceful protests and fiery uprisings in equal measure.

The violence of the white supremacist police state, a truth centuries in the making, has been exposed once again.

The smashed windows and the fires, of course, get most of the press attention, and have drawn the grateful ire of those who would distract us from the reasons this has all erupted in the first place. There is growing evidence that some on the extreme right are attempting to co-opt some of the chaos toward their own ends, as they seek to harm communities of color and spark a racial civil war.

Far too much media attention is being lavished upon “looting”: Images of citizens from all racial backgrounds taking food, toiletries and other goods from stores amid the chaos have dominated the news cycles, threatening to bury the story at the heart of the matter.

But the coverage of this development fails to acknowledge the actual context: millions of people enduring massive economic disruption amid COVID-19 who are out of work and out of money. I speak of the millions of people who have suffered a lifetime of menace from the police and whose immediate desperation makes no purchase on the conscience of men like Mitch McConnell, who has balked at providing further relief to them because he does not see doing so as ideologically sound.

What relief that has been provided came in the guise of a now long-gone $1,200 payment that many who needed it most never saw, while the trillions of dollars earmarked for relief more than two months ago was plundered by wealthy corporations and friends of Donald Trump.

The dead were looted from us all by a racist police state that now has reacted with unrestrained violence against the people they are sworn to protect.

Who, then, are the true looters here?

There is always another microwave or television to put on the shelf of a store. There will never, ever, be another George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Eric Garner, Atatiana Jefferson, Botham Jean, Sandra Bland, Tamir Rice, Philando Castile, Tanisha Anderson, Michael Brown or Freddie Gray.

The dead were looted from us all by a racist police state that now has reacted with unrestrained violence against the people they are sworn to protect.

In Minneapolis, a woman standing peacefully on her own porch is fired upon by battle-armored police.

In New York City, a police officer pulls down the COVID mask of a young Black man who has his arms raised to pepper spray him in the face.

In Grand Rapids, a lone and unarmed protester is maced and shot in the face with a tear gas cannister by police.

In Atlanta, police smash the windows of a car containing a Black couple, haul them bodily from the vehicle, and taze them.

Also in Minneapolis, Vice News reporter Michael Adams is pepper sprayed by police as he lays on the ground in full compliance with orders. The violence against this reporter was echoed all across the country as journalists were viciously targeted by police.

Video footage of scenes like this has been piling up like the pallets of bricks that are mysteriously appearing at protest locations with no construction zones in sight.

Either these out-of-control violent cops don’t know that phones come with cameras now, or they simply don’t care. That latter possibility — nay, probability — is the deeply disquieting rub.

This is a fulcrum moment for the nation, one that could tilt either way.

A great many people are leaning hard into the nexus of change that has exploded before us due to a most lethal confluence of reasons: More than 100,000 dead and more than 40 million unemployed in an out-of-control pandemic presided over by a monster president even as Black men are slaughtered by cops in the name of the white power state, and oh by the way, the ocean is still coming.

The police, in many places, are leaning back with an arsenal of violent intent. The extreme ferocity of the police reaction is prima facie evidence of a state willing to commit virtually any atrocity in the defense of the racist status quo.

In response, we need to keep leaning. If you can, get out in the street with the protesters, or start your own small one where you live. If the streets are not possible for you, do what you can to stand in support, because everything counts. There are many ways to stand and fight in this moment of truth.

This is a fulcrum moment for the nation, one that could tilt either way. Either we secure a measure of justice through sustained effort, or the authoritarian pushback that has already begun will hurl us down into a darkness as yet uncomprehended should we weaken or stagger.

We must not. “Someday” is now. We can only write a better future if we are true to each other, to ourselves, and to the legion of victims who cry for justice from beyond this vale of fathomless sorrow.

          I could ask Pitt, if Trump is the cause of the rioting and looting, then why didn't the Jews riot and loot Germany during WWII?

     If Trump is the racist that the Left portrays him as being, thus causing the problems, then Hitler's actions should have caused extreme reaction.

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