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  1. We Should Have Known. . . We’ve known for 5,000 years that mass spying on one’s own people is usually aimed at grabbing power and crushing dissent, not protecting us from bad guys. We’ve known for 4,000 years that debts need to be periodically written down, or the entire economy will collapse. And see this. We’ve known for 2,500 years that prolonged war bankrupts an economy. We’ve known for 2,000 years that wars are based on lies. We’ve known for 1,900 years that runaway inequality destroys societies. We’ve known for 1,700 years that torture is a form of terrorism. We’ve known for thousands of years that debasing currencies leads to economic collapse. We’ve known for millennia that – when criminals are not punished – crime spreads. We’ve known for thousands of years that the rich and powerful try to censor their critics under the guise of heresy. We’ve known for hundreds of years that the failure to punish financial fraud destroys economies, as it destroys all trust in the financial system. We’ve known for centuries that monopolies and the political influence which accompanies too much power in too few hands are dangerous for free markets. We’ve known for hundreds of years that companies will try to pawn their debts off on governments, and that it is a huge mistake for governments to allow corporate debt to be backstopped by government. We’ve known for centuries that powerful people – unless held to account – will get together and steal from everyone else. We’ve known for hundreds of years that standing armies and warmongering harm Western civilization. We’ve known for over 300 years that going into debt to pay for war ruins any nation. We’ve known for 200 years that allowing private banks to control credit creation eventually destroys the nation’s prosperity. We’ve known for two centuries that a fiat money system – where the money supply is not pegged to anything real – is harmful in the long-run. We’ve known for 200 years that a two-party system quickly becomes corrupted. We’ve known for over a century that torture produces false and useless information. We’ve known since the 1930s Great Depression that separating depository banking from speculative investment banking is key to economic stability. See this, this, this and this. We’ve known for 80 years that inflation is a hidden tax. We’ve known for 79 years that war is a racket that benefits the elites but harms everyone else. We’ve known since 1988 that quantitative easing doesn’t work to rescue an ailing economy. We’ve known since 1993 that derivatives such as credit default swaps – if not reined in – could take down the economy. And see this. We’ve known since 1998 that crony capitalism destroys even the strongest economies, and that economies that are capitalist in name only need major reforms to create accountability and competitive markets. We’ve known since 2007 or earlier that lax oversight of hedge funds could blow up the economy. And we knew before the 2008 financial crash and subsequent bailouts that: The easy credit policy of the Fed and other central banks, the failure to regulate the shadow banking system, and “the use of gimmicks and palliatives” by central banks hurt the economy Anything other than (1) letting asset prices fall to their true market value, (2) increasing savings rates, and (3) forcing companies to write off bad debts “will only make things worse” Bailouts of big banks harm the economy. The Fed and other central banks were simply transferring risk from private banks to governments, which could lead to a sovereign debt crisis. Postscript: Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it … and we’ve known that for a long time. The post Are We Doomed To Keep Making The Same Mistakes appeared first on Militia News. Original Source
  2. The United Nations is a grand failure that has never worked and will never work. The idea of the U.N. was invented during the Second World War, when the term “United Nations” actually meant the wartime alliance of certain nations against other nations. From the very beginning, the fact that the “United Nations” included the Soviet Union, which had conspired with Nazi Germany to begin the Second World War and which engaged in aggressive war and genocide just like Nazi Germany, was a sick joke. Our Soviet “ally” let us fight Japan alone until the end of the war, and it occupied and enslaved those very nations in Eastern Europe that Britain and France had gone to war with Germany to protect. The structure of the organization was set as a part of the peace following the Second World War, with all the macabre features of that uneven peace. The permanent members of the Security Council were, and are, the Big Five of America, Britain, France, China, and Russia. China meant Free China, but now it means Communist China. Russia was the Soviet Union, but today Russia is only half the size of the old Soviet Union. Japan and Germany were not permanent members of the Security Council, although in any sane world, these two nations, the third and fourth largest economies in the world and both peaceful democracies, ought to be permanent members. Yet the legacy of the Second World War, when these two nations were the foes of the “United Nations,” remains. India, which gained independence after the United Nations was formed, also ought to be a permanent member of the Security Council, but it is not. The United Nations was created primarily to preserve peace, but it has never succeeded in that at all, nor has it prevented the genocides that so horrified the civilized world after the Second World War ended. The reasons why are pretty clear. Most of the “nations” represented in the United Nations are little more than brutal ruling gangs, who suppress captive peoples like the Kurds and Tibetans and who routinely deny the most basic human rights to those they rule. Written by Bruce Walker. The post Leave the United Nations appeared first on Militia News. Original Source
  3. This article was written by Daisy Luther and originally published at The Organic Prepper. Editor’s Comment: Keeping up-to-date on relevant information, and keeping mentally alert and prepared are very important aspects of prepping, and readying yourself for survival during an emergency, or how to handle a long and drawn-out collapse. If you know this stuff, use it. If you don’t, catch up and learn – pay the information forward and teach these skills to friends, allies and the next generation. Armed with enough knowledge, itself a form of power, we could take back our country and lives. 25 Books Every Prepared Family Should Own by Daisy Luther Preppers tend to be relatively old-fashioned, and one thing that most of us have in common is a yen to own physical copies of information that we find valuable. While ebooks are popular, inexpensive (sometimes even free), and take up zero space, every person who preps knows that those tomes of information might not be available in a down-grid situation. Your library will only be accessible until your Kindle dies. But when you have all of those books on the shelf, you can access the information over and over, for as long as your emergency lasts. (Plus, I just really prefer physical books.) There are tons of other great books out there, so if your favorite isn’t included on the list, that doesn’t mean that I found anything wrong with it. The following list is of the books that I personally own and have found to be valuable. (Note: Due to shameless self-promotion, my own books are on the list and marked with a *.) Here are the 25 preparedness books that I recommend that you all have in your personal libraries. General Preparedness The Prepper’s Blueprint The Survival Mom: How to Prepare Your Family for Everyday Disasters and Worst-Case Scenarios Urban Emergency Survival Plan SAS Survival Handbook (This is the perfect size to slip into a purse, backpack, or glovebox) Prepper’s Survival Hacks Handbook to Practical Disaster Preparedness for the Family Food The Pantry Primer: A Prepper’s Guide to Whole Food on a Half Price Budget* The Prepper’s Cookbook Food Storage for Self-Sufficiency and Survival Water The Prepper’s Water Survival Guide* Health Prepper’s Natural Medicine The Survival Medicine Handbook When There Is No Doctor Where There Is No Dentist Prepping for a Pandemic Self-sufficiency The Encyclopedia of Country Living The Prepper’s Canning Guide* (coming in March) Tools for Survival The Backyard Homestead Bushcraft 101 The Complete Tightwad Gazette Home and Personal Defense Prepper’s Home Defense Contact: A Tactical Manual for Post-Collapse Survival Prepper’s Armed Defense Rapid Fire: Tactics for High Threat, Protection, and Combat Operations What books would you add to the list? This article was written by Daisy Luther and originally published at The Organic Prepper. Continue reading...
  4. Do you remember the holy trinity of survival? Food, water, shelter: does that ring a bell? Also, do you know the rule of threes? You can survive for 3 minutes without oxygen, for 3 days without water and for 3 weeks without food. Well, how about hypothermia? Do you have any idea how long will you last out there in the cold during a wintertime apocalypse? The thing is that in an extremely cold environment, if you cannot find or you cannot build an emergency shelter, you’ll die from exposure in a matter of hours. It’s also worth noting that you’ll be totally incapacitated a long time before your actual death. Cold has this effect on people, you know. In a winter outdoors survival situation, your worst enemies are frostbite and hypothermia along with other conditions like dehydration, but let’s concentrate upon what will kill you first. Besides wearing the proper (layered) clothing, knowing how to build a snow shelter in an emergency situation in order to maintain a proper body temperature should be mandatory for any outdoors enthusiast. Winter presents many survival challenges but also a lot of lessons. Now is the time to practice unique survival skills. CLICK HERE to subscribe to Survivopedia’s newsletter and get this month’s Free Report about how to practice your survival skills during winter. The best thing about snow is that it makes for an excellent insulator. We’ve already talked about it in our article about how to insulate your homestead using snow during the cold winter months in order to save on your energy bill. How To Build a Snow Shelter Snow can be used for building a survival shelter, also known as a quinzee, which is basically a large pile of snow, a mound of sorts, that has been hollowed out, thus making for a cave-like place to rest, sleep, keep yourself alive and so on and so forth. Basically, a quinzee is a man-made snow cave inspired most probably from what dogs and wolves do when a blizzard’s coming their way: i.e. they dig a hole in the snow and they wait for the storm to pass. The thing is, for building a quinzee you’ll definitely require a snow shovel or something similar, as you’ll have to move around and dig out a lot of snow. The best design in an emergency survival scenario, especially if you’re out there alone and you lack basic tools, is the snow trench shelter which is easier to build using just your hands. To begin with, you should be aware of 2 main things: First, practice makes perfect. Therefore, you should practice building a snow shelter in your backyard using meager means for as long as it takes. Don’t use snow blowers and high-tech stuff. That’s cheating. I am talking about acquiring the skills first because theoretical knowledge alone won’t save your life in a survival scenario; it’s just not enough. Second, while practicing DIY-ing a snow shelter, you’ll realize the amount of effort and elbow grease that it takes for piling and packing snow, then removing some of it for just a one-person space. Even if it’s 10 degrees outside, you’ll be breaking a sweat constantly, and that’s particularly dangerous from multiple points of view in a real life winter survival scenario, because of the risk of dehydration and hypothermia, not to mention exhaustion. Most experts agree that building a snow shelter is not a feasible endeavor for just one person, especially if you try to do it in a hurry and you lack basic tools (like a shovel), so fair warning. However, it’s also very true that when confronted with imminent death, humans actually gain superpowers in the form of adrenaline kicks, hence you might have a chance after all, so don’t despair just yet. Another thing to remember is to never travel alone, even if we’re talking about short distances. You can easily get lost in a blizzard and find yourself in a world of pain. Now, the equipment you have at your disposal and the environment will determine the type of snow shelter you can build: a quinzee or a snow trench. Step 1. Find a proper location As usual, location is everything, so before starting digging, you should select the proper spot for your snow shelter. Always avoid windy slopes and areas of rockfall. In other words, never dig your snow shelter in the path of a potential rockfall or avalanche. Also, if you’re building on a windy slope, where the wind blows against your shelter, is very dangerous as snow can easily clog the entrance of your shelter overnight when you’re sleeping, thus preventing fresh air to get inside. You know what happens with asphyxia, right? In short, you’ll be dead without even knowing it. Step 2: Find an are with deep snow Next, try to find an area with deep snow, thus saving a lot of work. Ideally, you should look for a snowdrift that’s at least 5 feet deep. The consistency of the snow is another factor, as fresh snow tends to be powdery, thus pretty difficult to work with because it’s prone to collapsing when you’re trying to make a cave. The good news is that once disturbed, snow tends to harden, so if time is on your side, you should pile it up and wait for nature to take its course. So, considering that you’ve already determined the size of the snow shelter you want to build and you’ve located the sweet spot for it, you should begin with stomping out the diameter of the snow shelter (a quinzee in this particular case) while wearing snow-shoes (provided you have them) thus packing the interior down. In this way, you’ll create a strong platform upon which to build your snow shelter by eliminating layers in the snow. Video first seen on OutsideFun1. Step 3: Pile up the snow Now it’s time to start piling up the snow, assuming you have a shovel. As I already warned you, this may take a while, especially if you want to let the mound set up for a few hours, during which you may start building a fire, take a bite to eat while you wait, etc. This wait time is essential when building a quinzee, as it allows for sintering to kick in. Sintering is a fancy word which depicts the energy released by snow while moving inside the mound you’ve created, making for the snow crystals to bond together, thus acquiring structural integrity. Basically, sintering prevents the cave from collapsing over you while you’re sleeping inside; that’s the lesson to be taken home. Step 4: Dig a tunnel into the snow pile Now, provided your mound has firmed up, you have to start digging your hole and you should begin with punching a few sticks (a foot long) through the mound, as they’ll serve as guides while you dig up your slumber chamber. In the next phase, you’ll start digging the entry tunnel. You can plan on spending 2 or 3 hours digging the chamber area. You can use tarps, pans or snow shoes to scoop out/remove the snow that resulted from digging. When you’ve reached your guide sticks, stop digging. The ideal wall thickness is about 10 inches, so keep that in mind when designing your quinzee and putting your thickness markers in. Always remember to punch a few fist-size holes to let fresh air in. How To Build a Snow Trench Survival Shelter If the quinzee is not an option because you don’t have the time, the energy, the tools or none of the above (or you’re alone), you must go for a snow trench instead. Video first seen on Snowy Range Survival. In an emergency survival scenario, the best alternative is to dig a trench in the snow and use a tarp or something similar (wood branches covered with snow for example) as a roof of sorts. You can use tree branches or ski poles to prop the tarp up. Snow tranches are easier and faster to dig, but they’ll lack both the comfort and the warmth of a proper-made quinzee. Also, you can be buried in case of a heavy snowstorm, so keep that in mind too. As for my final words: if you’re the outdoors type and you’re roaming in the wild during the winter on a regular basis, always make sure you have the proper clothing and equipment that you’ll require in a survival scenario, including a compact snow shovel and never travel alone. Think about our ancestors, how they survived during the biggest winters in history and what mistakes they did – you don’t want to repeat them, trust me! If you’ve ever built a snow shelter or have any questions, please share them with us in the comment section below. This article has been written by Chris Black for Survivopedia. 847 total views, 8 views today Rate this article! [Total: 14 Average: 3.5/5] Continue reading...
  5. Actual shooting scenarios are nothing like what you see on TV or in the movies. In most cases, the shooter will be known to you, or perhaps know you better than you realize. Burglars, stalkers, and even serial killers may be in the background for months on end before they strike. Many times, there will be warning signs weeks, or even months before the shooting. If someone would read them signs, innocent lives would be saved. Think about the mass shootings where one or more people dedicate themselves to killing and destruction! Every second counts, and if you want to survive, you need to identify the killer before the shooting happens. Read this article to know how to do it! How Do I Know It’s a Shooter? Contrary to popular belief and erroneous stereotypes, clothing style, gun ownership, ethnic background, age, or religious affiliation are not necessarily good indicators that someone will become an active shooter. If you can always bear in mind that almost every criminal or terror based shooting is pre-planned, then it becomes much easier to spot the following signs (PAINS – Pre-Attack IndicatorS) in people around you, in different stages of their acting. Fantasy Stage Many shooters start off with a violent fantasy based in revenge or something else that evokes strong feelings. These individuals may use violent computer games, novels (example school shooters that got their start reading gun grabber Stephen King’s novel “Rage”), or even apps with subliminal messages that encourage more robust or increasingly graphic fantasies. There is a subtle, but discernible difference between someone that keeps these thoughts in the realm of pure fantasy and someone that develops a sincere wish to be at the center of such horrific acts. In general, if you talk to people in this stage of progression, you may feel very uncomfortable when they talk about violent movies, or you may even find that they have made drawings or created lists of actions to enable them to become an active shooter. Even though you may still believe the person is harmless, they are beginning on a slippery slope and may need psychiatric care. The Decision and Active Planning At some point, the prospective active shooter will make a decision to move from fantasy to tangible reality. This stage may involve more serious planning such as figuring out which weapons to use, obtaining plans for building bombs, or finding ways to train for their “big day”. Individuals in the planning stage may also begin talking more actively about their beliefs, and perhaps even seek to draw others into their increasingly sick and chaotic world. They will also seek out “heroic” figures that match some aspect of their ideology. Acquiring Weapons The next stage is an escalation and outgrowth of the previous stage. During this phase, the potential shooter will actively begin to acquire weapons, build bombs, and increase training intensity. They may no longer be interested in activities that would pull their attention away from preparing to become an active shooter. It is thought that this stage is the easiest to spot because the person is actively amassing weapons and building things needed for the main event. That being said, any one of these prospective shooters is just a movie or subliminal app away from adding ways to hide weapons caches or even indoctrinate others so that the element of surprise is preserved. It should also be noted that gun control is like the emperor with no clothes because those who intend to do harm will simply look for other weapons or seek other means. Countdown At some point, the individual will decide that they are done preparing, and that there is nothing left but to carry out their plans. This stage may also include leaving behind a will, putting up public warnings about their intentions, giving away valued possessions, and otherwise preparing for death. No matter whether they drive to the location, walk, or ride a bike, it will be up to random observers to notice unusual activity and report it to the police. From there, it is truly anybody’s guess as to whether or not the event will be halted or go through as planned. Active Shooting Once the individual reaches his/her chosen location, the shooting sequence will go forward pretty much as planned until someone with a gun stops them. Despite what gun grabbers try to say, it is only armed citizens at the scene that can stop an active shooter before one or more lives is taken. Without armed citizens at the scene, the active shooter will simply kill as many people as possible until the police get there. A well-organized shooter working with others may even move to blockade roads, use drones, or take other steps to prevent police, or even the military from responding. Other Symptoms to Look For Threat of harm to self or others. This may also include a history of violence or insensitivity to humans or animals. There may also be an increased interest in watching violence, an interest in violent actions, and looking to violent role models. In later stages, the person may indicate that they feel they will not survive their agenda. A sudden interest in firearms, bombs, or other items that may be used as part of killing others. Gun grabbers focus almost exclusively on gun ownership as a “warning sign” even though millions of gun owners have never gone on a shooting spree let alone attempted a suicide bombing. The key here is that the vast majority of people that make up the US gun culture are honest, law abiding people that come from all walks of life. These people take great pride in their weapons and seek to defend themselves and others against a range of risks. By all accounts, if an “interest in guns” was a true litmus test for increased risk, the number of active shooting scenarios would be much higher than it is. As the records stands, the vast majority of shootings in the United States are either self-inflicted suicide or shooting at a criminal. That being said, if someone shows a sudden interest in learning how to make bombs or other explosive devices, it might be a reliable indicator of risk because this behavior is not normal and is not part of any legitimate culture. Decline in work or academic performance, and also decreased social interactions with friends and family. In place of usual contacts, the individual may focus more on radical ideas that encourage violence. Beginning or increasing use of drugs. Personality, mood, hygiene, and social changes. What Should We Do? Most resources will say that you should report these signs immediately to the police, work supervisors, or others that may be able to redirect the person or help them choose a different path. While this is good advice, do not forget we are living in a society where supervisors may not agree with your assessment and the police may not be able to get involved for one reason or another, or might arrive too late to stop the shooting. At the same time, you may be living in a community or forced to work in a location where you cannot carry a gun. But you still need to defend yourself, so you could find an alternate mean of protection. There are a lot of article on our website about self-defense, but the answer depends pretty much on your ability to act and the skills you have trained for survival. Click the banner below and get your own self-defense tactical flashlight you can carry no matter where you go! This article has been written by Fred Tyrell for Survivopedia. References: https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn28300-how-to-spot-the-warning-signs-and-prevent-mass-shootings/ http://www.campussecurityreport.com/m-article-detail/educate-members-of-the-public-about-how-to-spot-report-potentially-dangerous-individuals.aspx 683 total views, 1 views today Rate this article! [Total: 22 Average: 3.4/5] Continue reading...
  6. Christmas time is almost here and I can’t stop thinking about the delightful experiences I am going to offer to my loved ones, both in terms of delicious meals and, of course, GIFTS! There is nothing I love more than making them happy. I am sure you are looking for Christmas gifts so in this week’s Prep Blog Review I am sharing with you some awesome DIY gifts ideas your prepper friends or family members will love when they will find them in their stockings on Christmas morning. Plus – there are some fun projects you can try with your little ones so involve them in this activity and make sure they won’t get bored during their winter holiday. If you have other ideas, please share them with us. 1. 30 Ways to Have Yourself a Thrifty Little Christmas “There are a lot of reasons that sensible people want to step off of the materialistic rocket ride that is the standard North American Christmas and have a frugal Christmas that focuses on traditions instead. Here’s an excerpt from a book I’ve written with my 16-year-old daughter. They may be tired of spending the entire following year working overtime because they are deep in debt for having produced a spectacular Christmas morning that was the stuff of storybooks. Maybe they don’t want to create children who are never satisfied and always want more, who always yearn for that next edition of the iGadget of the year. Perhaps they have suffered their own personal economic collapse and just can’t afford it this year. They might just want a sense of peace and contentment that you can never buy from a store. They might just want a sense of peace and contentment that you can never buy from a store.” Read more on The Organic Prepper. 2. 15 DIY Gifts in a Jar “I love making DIY gifts, especially around the holidays. Many times we want to show someone they are special to us without spending a lot of money, and so a homemade gift works perfectly. These gifts in a jar are adorable and are really inexpensive to make. You can make a themed jar based on something the person who you are gifting to likes – like the baking jar or flower garden listed below. We also have a really fun list of cookies in a jar!” Read more on Kids Activities Blog. 3. M&M Mason Jar Cookie Recipe: A Perfect holiday Gift Idea “Need a gift for the cookie lover on your list? Here’s a fix of M&M mason jar cookie recipe to serve up lots of smiles this yuletide season. Make gift giving more personalized with this. All you need to make mason jar cookie recipes are your basic cookie ingredients, a mason jar, and a little bit of time. By taking a few extra minutes to divide and layer your cookie ingredients, rather than mixing them, and then putting all in a pretty jar, you have an adorable, quick and delicious gift idea.” Read more on Pioneer Settler. 4. 58 DIY Christmas Gifts Your Friends and Family Will Love “Spread holiday cheer with these sweet and simple handmade gifts. Pinecone Fire Starters: The only problem with making these pinecone fire starters? You’ll end up wanting to keep these beautiful favors for yourself!” Read more on Country Living. This article has been written by Drew Stratton for Survivopedia. 355 total views, no views today Rate this article! [Total: 8 Average: 2.5/5] Continue reading...
  7. Roosters. These beautiful birds often earn a bad reputation. But, when carefully selected and introduced, a rooster can be a blessing to your hens, not a curse. I’ll jump into the how-to part of adding the rooster a little later in this post. Keep reading to find out more! But first, let’s talk about some basics behind adding a male bird (or birds) to your flock. How Many Roosters? If you have too many roosters, they’ll spend more time fighting than doing their job. A good way to calculate how many roosters you need is to count your hens. You want one rooster for every six-ten hens. That way every rooster can have his own little flock of hens to care for and breed with. Your hens will be happy because there won’t be three roosters trying to mate with each one. It’s a good ratio to try and maintain. When deciding upon the number of roosters, take into account the following factors: Space Are your chickens confined to a pen and a run? If so, you’ll need significantly more space per bird if you plan to keep multiple roosters in there. Each one needs plenty of space for his flock. If your chickens free-range, you’ll be able to get away with less space in the coop. But, you’ll want to make sure you don’t go below the minimum recommended space of four square feet per bird. Having multiple, small coops available also helps minimize rooster squabbles. Or maybe you’ll have some of your birds roost on the barn roof at night like mine do. No matter where they are, make sure each rooster has roosting space to enjoy at night with his hens. They will enjoy being together night and day. Feeders and Waterers Many rooster fights originate over a battle for resources. If you have multiple roosters, you may need multiple feeders and waterers too. You definitely want to keep an eye on your flock, and if there are meal time problems add some additional options. You’ll want them to have plenty of food and water for their ladies. Roosters will eat whatever your hens are eating, so you won’t need to worry about separating food. Noise Roosters are roosters. And they make noise. Contrary to popular belief and many movies, roosters don’t just crow when the sun comes up. They crow pretty much all day, or at least mine do. When a hen lays an egg? They crow. When they sense danger? They crow. Roosters are loud. So if you have a backyard flock in the city, be sure to check out your town’s ordinances before introducing a male. They aren’t as easy to hide behind a privacy fence as hens are. How to Pick a Rooster There are so many breeds of chickens available, so you’ll have plenty of choices for your rooster. While there are breeds that are known for being more docile, each rooster will have a temperament all his own. That means you can pick a docile breed and still end up with a mean rooster. Likewise, you can raise a rooster from an aggressive breed, and wind up with a sweet, docile boy. So basically, there are no guarantees when buying a rooster when you buy one as a baby. I’ve had the best luck with banty roosters. My Ameraucanas, Australorps, and Blue Andalusians were all aggressive. While Ameraucanas are typically aggressive, Australorps are supposed be more docile. The banty roosters have been fine. So have all of our new cockerels since the initial banty, that are half banty. There’s been a little fighting, typically when a new batch matures in the summer, and they establish a new pecking order. Thankfully, there’s been no aggression towards myself or my children with these smaller roos. Since breed isn’t a reliable indicator of a rooster’s personality, here are some characteristics to watch for when buying a rooster that’s full-grown. Hopefully you’ll have a chance to see him in action at his current residence before purchasing. What do the backs of the hens this rooster is with look like? (You don’t want a rooster that tears up the backs of his ladies.) Has the current owner noticed any aggression? Is this rooster the dominant one at the top of flock, or a beta male? Does the rooster share food with the hens, or does he keep it for himself? How old is the rooster? (Young roosters who are just figuring out the mating thing are typically the roughest on hens.) Is the rooster healthy? Be careful buying roosters sight unseen unless you’re prepared for your new rooster to end up in the stew pot. Many people who get rid of their roosters are getting culling a problem bird. It’s not always the case, but is common enough that you should always be aware of it. 3 Ways to Introduce a Rooster to Your Flock Over the years, I’ve introduced roosters to my flock in three different ways. They were all successful, but each had their pros and cons. 1. Buying a Rooster Initially with Baby Hens The easiest way to introduce a rooster to your flock is to do it before your flock is established. When you’re buying baby chicks for the first time, just add roosters to your order to maintain the proper hen to rooster ratio. This is how I started off. I ordered my chicks, added a couple of cockerels to the order and raised them all together. They established their pecking order from the time they were small, and I didn’t have a problem with fighting. The chickens and roosters knew each other. I didn’t have to worry about isolating new birds, or introducing illness. It was simple. But, you really don’t know the temperament of roosters until they are bigger. The roosters I ordered as cockerels turned mean. They were a risk to the children, and those roosters are no longer on the farm. 2. Adding a Full-Grown Rooster to Your Hens About the time I got rid of my other roosters, a friend of the family had given my mom a small flock of banty chickens that included two roosters. At first, she kept her flock in her coop across the road, though the long-term goal was always for them to move over here to join my flock. Isolation: It Takes Time The new birds were kept them in their coop for three weeks. This isolation time allowed for illnesses to be displayed. The birds were healthy. Whenever you introduce a new bird, it’s important to not just stick them into your flock and hope everything goes well. A quarantine period allows you to check for mites and disease. That way you don’t inadvertently expose all your chickens. If you don’t have a separate coop, you can create a smaller coop inside your existing one with chicken wire. Or you can use a shed or barn on your property. It won’t be forever, so as long as the space is predator proof it’ll work. For introducing a single rooster, you can also use a large dog crate. I did this when introducing a batch of chicks, and it worked well for the birds to get to know each other. Just be sure to keep an eye on food and water in the isolation unit, and make sure you don’t let the birds get too cramped. Start with Face to Face meetings in Large Spaces Once you know your new rooster is healthy, you still don’t want to just add him directly to your flock. Give them time to get to know each other in a less territorial space. My chickens and the new chickens free ranged together at my house. They had plenty of space, and at first both flocks stayed separate. They each foraged over a different section of land, and all went to their known coops at night. After a few days of this distant meetings, the birds began to mingle. This mingling was repeated every day, and became more frequent. Let the Rooster in at Night Now that all the birds knew each other, it was time for the next phase of the assimilation. One evening after all the birds were roosting, I began to move the new ones. Since they were roosting, they were calm and easy to move. I walked each bird across the street and into my coop. In the coop, I placed them on an extra roosting pole. That way they weren’t directly touching any of my existing flock. By introducing the birds to sleeping together at night, the birds will be more likely to accept the new member. Then you can just let them all out in the morning. Don’t Let Your Chickens Be Bored Many problems with roosters arise when they’re bored. To solve this problem, provide your chickens with some activities they can do together. Provide a spot for them to take dust baths. Toss out some grains and let them scratch. Give them your food scraps. These things are simple, but will keep your chickens engaged and busy. They’ll be less likely to fight. Know a Pecking Order Will Be Established Even when you take precautions to introduce your new rooster, there will be changes in your flock. Each rooster will want his own girls, and there will be a new pecking order established. There might be some squabbles while this occurs, but they should be minor. If you notice severe fighting, or injury, the rooster might not be a good fit for your flock. Slow down and go back to isolation at night. Once my flock had its new pecking order figured out, one rooster took his hens to the barn to sleep at night. Since they could get up high on the rafters, they were impossible for me to get back down and bring into the coop. So they still sleep there at night. You might notice your chickens and roosters sleeping a little differently as well. 3. Letting Hens Hatch New Roosters The final way that I’ve introduced new roosters into the flock is to have my hens do it for me. One benefit of having a rooster around is the fertile eggs. If you have a hen that will brood, you can have a self-sufficient flock. When the chicks hatch, the mother hen will take care of flock introductions. By the time the hen leaves her chicks, they are grown enough to know their spot in the flock. But, there will be a new pecking order established. I’ve seen the most problem as the new roosters begin to become interested in mating. They will always try to claim hens for himself. In that process, he will almost always step on the toes of an established rooster. There’s a bit of squabbling, but the older roosters help the young ones learn their place. The downside of this method is you can end up with too many roosters. So be prepared to cull some for the stew pot to keep there from being many problems. Then you’ll get both meat and eggs from your flock! Adding a new rooster can take time. But, having one around can bring plenty of benefits to your flock. A chicken flock is as crucial for your homestead nowadays as it was for our grandparents in the past. Discover the secrets that helped them survive during harsh times. This article has been written by Lisa Tanner for Survivopedia. 566 total views, 5 views today Rate this article! [Total: 20 Average: 3.1/5] Continue reading...
  8. Winter, in most parts of the US, is never a good time for animals. It’s cold and often wet, the days are short, and fresh grass is non-existent. It’s no wonder that milk production may slow down a bit. For example, cows get stressed when it’s cold, and they don’t produce as much milk as cows that are comfortable. Routines change, it’s colder, the food is different, there are many factors that stress your cow, but the number one stressor is cold. We talked about how to get more eggs. This time, let’s see what to do to boost your dairy cows and keep the milk coming in the freezing winter days! 1. Have Your Cows in Good Condition Before winter sets in, it’s important that your cow is in good physical condition. She needs to be at a good weight, and she needs time to acclimate to the cold so that she can grow her winter coat. If she’s going to be outside for winter, leave her outside as the days grow shorter and the weather drops. If she’s used to being in a barn during the summer, she’ll need to stay in it during the winter, too. Assess your cows a couple of months before winter. Body fat is going to be one of the top two factors that help her stay warm. If you only have one or two cows, this obviously isn’t as difficult as if you have a herd. Still, if your girls are a little on the thin side, increase their feed so that they’re carrying the right amount of weight heading into winter. This will keep them from stressing so much from the cold. If they’re thin, they’ll use what fat stores they have to keep warm instead of giving milk. Thin cows may also produce weak calves, have problems producing colostrum, and take longer to come back into heat. How your cow should look depends upon her breed and age – two year olds are the toughest if they’re breeding because she’s giving milk, growing, and eating to feed a baby, too. She may need A LOT of feed. Know your cows and know what they need. On the other end of the spectrum, if your cow is obese, she’s not going to winter as well either. Just like people, obesity in an animal does not contribute to good health. Adjust feed as necessary. In addition to keeping her milk production up, being at a good weight will also help her give birth easier if she’s pregnant, and will help her regain her weight and come into heat earlier after she gives birth. 2. Feed them Enough of the Right Feed Throughout winter, your cows are going to need more food that they do during the summer. It’s also important that they have access to plenty of water and a salt lick as well. Roughage – hay – is what helps a cow produce the energy she needs to stay warm and happy. If she doesn’t have enough hay, the weight will fall off of her. This is because the fermentation and breakdown of the cellulose in the hay creates energy. High quality alfalfa may provide plenty of nutrients, but alone, it won’t provide enough roughage for your cows to stay warm. You may not know it, (if you don’t, you should) but cows shiver. If they get that cold, they’re burning calories like mad. You need to avoid that. Give them plenty of hay. Just so you know, a cow’s energy needs increase by anywhere from 17-50 percent after giving birth, so there’s a starting point for you. Next, consider the temperature. A cow in good physical condition that has acclimated to winter by growing a good coat is good to go on regular winter rations until she reaches her critical temperature. That temperature is around 20-30 degrees F. At that point, she’s burning fat to keep warm and you need to increase her feed in order to keep getting milk. A rough rule of thumb is to increase her rations by 1 percent for each 2 degrees below critical temperature. Once the temperature drops below zero, she may be eating up to a third more than she would at 50 degrees just to maintain her body heat. Don’t forget to factor in wind chill, length of the cold snap, and whether or not she’s wet. Even the best winter coat doesn’t trap body heat if it’s wet – imagine going outside in wet clothing. 3. Give them a Morning Boost This goes along with feed, but I thought that it merited its own section because it’s just that important. If you’re counting on pasture to provide part of your rations, you may need to give your ladies a little push in the mornings with some hay to get them warm. Even though there’s pasture available, if they’re cold, they’ll stand huddled to preserve body heat instead of going out to graze. Give them some hay in the morning to get their bodies producing heat and then they’ll go out and graze. 4. Build a Shelter You know that even if it’s 40 or 50 degrees, if there’s a good wind blowing, you’re going to pull up your collar and huddle into your coat. If it’s raining, it’s even worse. It feels a lot colder than it actually is. Your cows feel the same way. It’s important that your cows have shelter. If you don’t have to worry about much snow or wet, then a windbreak may do, but if it’s raining or snowing much, they need a at least a lean-to to shelter in. A barn is preferable. Whichever route you go, your cows need to have a warm, dry place to get in out of the weather if it’s cold. If you keep them in a barn, make sure that it’s well-ventilated. Damp and moisture lead to respiratory conditions in cows. If you’re getting a blizzard, you can partially close some of the vents to keep the snow from blowing in, but you want at least a half inch of open ventilation for each 10 feet of building width, no matter what. Provide Adequate Bedding If you have free stalls or lean-tos where your cows sleep, provide adequate bedding in them. This means that it should be dry and there should be enough to provide some warmth. 5. Protect Her Teats Just like our delicate lips, faces, and hands get chapped in the cold, so do a cow’s teats. It’s extremely important that you make sure that her teats are dry when she leaves the milking stall or feed area, and you should also provide windbreaks around the barn, too. Bag balm is called that for a reason. It helps sooth bags and teats that may be moderately irritated. Dip teats before milking and after milking. Though it adds a few seconds to the process, it’s worth it because it really does help reduce mastitis both directly by killing bacteria and because chapped, cracked teats inhibit the milk from dropping, which leads to infection. Video first seen on MonkeySee. Use germicidal dips that also contain 5-12 percent skin conditioners. Don’t wash them because that washes off the natural protective oils, and make sure that the teats are dry before they leave the milk shed. Warm, well-cared-for cows are happy, healthy cows who give lots of milk. If she’s stressed so much by being cold, or is so cold that she uses all her energy staying warm, or if her teats are chapped and sore, she’s not going to give good milk. Your goals should be keeping her warm and healthy, and these are all steps toward that outcome. Are you prepared for a coming food crisis? Click the banner below and discover how you can feed your family with healthy foods during any collapse! This article has been wrriten by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 512 total views, 2 views today Rate this article! [Total: 7 Average: 2.3/5] Continue reading...
  9. In this video, Veteran U.S. Navy SEAL Dom Raso breaks down the science behind “dodging full auto” using an iconic scene from “White House Down.” Raso explains how Channing Tatum is able to disarm his opponent by making the right moves at the right time in this installment of the Freestyle Media Lab Series sponsored by Daniel Defense. The post The Media Lab Breaks Down The Science of Dodging Full Auto appeared first on Bearing Arms. Continue reading...
  10. Love him or hate him, Detroit Lions’ quarterback Matthew Stafford’s latest move off the field is earning him fans across the nation. After Detroit Police Corporal Myron Jarrett was killed by hit-and-run driver during a traffic stop on Oct. 28th, his fellow officers stepped up to help his family, organizing a fundraiser to help his wife Sacha and their four children. On Wednesday morning, Stafford and his wife played “Mr. and Mrs. Claus”, bringing gifts to the Jarrett home before Christmas. “This is just an indication of the family that we have in the DPD. Corporal Jarrett was a part of our family and this is also a way of saying that we never forget,” Police Chief James Craig said. “I have a daughter that’s a senior in high school so she’s really taking it hard and her father won’t be there for her graduation so it’s very difficult for her. So this is going to be double for her not having him for the holidays as well as not being at her graduation in June,” his wife, Sacha Jarrett, said. “I really want to let them know that I appreciate everything, the outpouring of support for my kids has been overwhelming and I’m just so happy,” Sacha said. The post Matthew Stafford Plays Santa to Fallen Officer’s Family appeared first on Bearing Arms. Continue reading...
  11. During World War II, the M1 Garand rifle proved its mettle on countless battlefields around the globe and was universally recognized as the premier general-issue service rifle of the war. Springfield Armory and Winchester manufactured over 4 million M1 rifles by 1945, and it was generally assumed that there would be an adequate supply of Garands to equip the post-war American military. However, this assumption was proven wrong when the North Koreans invaded South Korea in 1950. The pared-down American armed forces were ill prepared for another war. Obviously, one of the key weapons needed was the battle-proven M1 rifle. The Garands left over from WWII were refurbished and issued to troops deploying to Korea, but it was feared that existing supplies would be insufficient to meet the unexpected demand. Springfield Armory was ordered to get new M1 rifles back into production as soon as possible, but the lag time required to obtain the necessary machinery and manpower to accomplish this task proved more difficult than expected. The only viable solution was to acquire the additional rifles from civilian manufacturers. This was certainly not without precedent, as commercial manufacturers had supplied weaponry to the U.S. military almost from the founding of the republic. New Supplier One of the reasons International Harvester was chosen to make M1 Garands in 1952 was because its Evansville, Indiana, plant was very far from other arms-makers, meaning a possible nuclear attack from the Soviet Union wouldn’t cripple the country’s ability to make weapons. In order to augment Springfield Armory’s production, two civilian firms were selected to manufacture the new M1 rifles: the International Harvester Company (IHC) and Harrington & Richardson. On June 15, 1951, a contract was granted to IHC for 100,000 M1 Garand rifles to be manufactured at the firm’s Evansville, Indiana, plant, with production to start by December of 1952. The Evansville plant was constructed during WWII by the Republic Aviation Corporation to manufacture P-47 Thunderbolt fighter aircraft. After the war, the plant was purchased by IHC for manufacturing various types of commercial products, including air conditioners, refrigeration units and farming equipment. RELATED STORY: Viet Cong Weaponry – 14 Small Arms From the Vietnam War At first glance, IHC would seem to be a rather odd selection for manufacturing military service rifles since the company had absolutely no prior experience in the production of firearms. Interestingly, one of the primary reasons for choosing IHC was the plant’s geographic location. It must be remembered that by the early 1950s, the looming threat of nuclear war with the Soviet Union was uppermost in the minds of our military planners. The dispersion of vital military production facilities was deemed a very important consideration. During WWII, the only two manufacturers of M1 rifles were Springfield Armory and Winchester, which were only about 60 miles apart. This was not viewed as a problem in the 1940s. However, by the early 1950s, it was recognized that a nuclear strike on the Eastern Seaboard could deal a crippling blow to the nation’s arms production. In addition to IHC’s M1 rifle production, Harrington & Richardson was subsequently granted a contract on April 3, 1952, for the manufacture of 100,000 Garand rifles with additional contracts to follow. IHC was assigned two separate blocks of serial numbers for M1 rifle production: 4,400,000 to 4,660,000 and 5,000,501 to 5,278,245. Early Issues IHC’s M1 Garands used quality barrels made by the Line Material Company in Milwaukee. On this barrel, note the punch mark between the “LMR” marking and the drawing number. As IHC began plans for production of the M1 Garand, a number of formidable problems became apparent. The firm’s lack of experience in manufacturing firearms made the problems worse. In hindsight, it is obvious that IHC was ill prepared for the new challenge. The company’s management naively believed it could make the Garand rifles using its existing manufacturing equipment without the expenses and delays of acquiring specialized firearm gun-making machinery. This naivety was further evidenced in the company’s grossly optimistic goal of delivering the first rifles by Christmas of 1952. With the exception of the receiver, the barrel was the most complicated component to manufacture. It was decided to subcontract the production of IHC’s M1 Garand rifle barrels to the Line Material Company based out of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. This company was a well-regarded maker of various equipment items used in the transmission of electrical and telephone lines. Line Material’s foray in making M1 rifle barrels was not limited to IHC, as the company also made large numbers of barrels for use in rebuilding Garand rifles at several ordnance facilities. The barrels made by the company were of of the highest quality thanks to exacting standards. RELATED STORY: Remington Model 10 Shotgun – The Other Trench Fighter The barrels made by Line Material can be identified by the “LMR” marking on the right side, stamped next to the drawing number (D653448), month and year of production, heat lot identification, “P” (proof) and “M” (magnetic particle inspection). Except for very early examples, the barrels made under subcontract for IHC can be identified by a punch mark between the “LMR” and the drawing number. Unfortunately for IHC, the availability of the excellent LMR barrels was one of few things that went right during the startup of Garand production. As the myriad problems faced by the fledgling arms-maker surfaced, John Stimson—John Garand’s chief tool-and-die maker—was sent to the Evansville plant to help rectify the production woes. As production slowly got underway, serious functioning issues arose, with the most vexing being a tendency for the rifle to badly jam. This problem resulted in the assembly line being shut down for three months. Eventually, engineers discovered that the jamming issue was caused by flawed spring tension setting specifications. Receiver Sources IHC received its M1 Garand receivers from a few different sources. Here you can see a Springfield Armory-made receiver with “Postage Stamp”-style markings. Although IHC made most of the receivers used in its M1 rifles, the firm did acquire a number of receivers from Springfield Armory and Harrington & Richardson. Eventually, there were four distinct variations of M1 receivers manufactured by Springfield Armory and H&R for International Harvester. These are in addition to the receivers made by IHC. SA/IHC “Arrowhead”: The first receivers made by Springfield Armory for IHC were in the 4,440,000 to 4,441,100 serial-number range. The logo markings on the receiver were applied by Springfield Armory, and serial numbers were stamped at the IHC plant. Most were fitted with LMR barrels. These receivers have been nicknamed “Arrowheads” by collectors because the configuration of the nomenclature markings vaguely resembles an arrowhead with a broken tip. SA/IHC “Postage Stamp”: The second variant of M1 Garand receivers supplied by Springfield Armory with the nomenclature marking consisting of four even lines stamped on the receiver. Collectors have dubbed these the “Postage Stamp” type. The majority of these rifles were assembled with LMR barrels (generally dated late 1952 or early 1953). RELATED STORY: World War I Excellence – Air Service M1903 Rifle SA/IHC 4.6 Million “Gap Letter”: The third variation of M1 receiver acquired by IHC from Springfield Armory was the so-called “Gap Letter” type, which had a noticeable space between the centers of the first two lines of the nomenclature logo. The reason for this change in the marking format is not known. SA/IHC 5 Million “Gap Letter”: The final variant of receiver made by Springfield Armory for IHC to fulfill the latter’s production commitments was the “Gap Letter” variety. These receivers were serially numbered in the assigned range 5,198,034 to 5,213,034, and consisted of about 15,000 units. H&R/IHC Receivers: Near the end of IHC’s production run, the company needed additional receivers to complete its production commitments. To this end, a relatively small quantity of M1 Garand receivers (approximately 4,000) was supplied to IHC by Harrington & Richardson. These fall into the 5,213,034 to 5,217,065 serial-number range. It is interesting to note that the logo nomenclature on these receivers appears to have been stamped by IHC (with a “Postage Stamp” profile), although the serial numbers and the drawing numbers on the receiver leg were applied by Harrington & Richardson. In-House Progress A few makers supplied the smooth walnut stocks for IHC Garands, but the S.E. Overton Company made most of them. Although Springfield Armory and Harrington & Richardson supplied IHC with a number of receivers, the vast majority of the company’s M1 receivers were made in-house. All of these were of the “Postage Stamp” variety. The receiver drawing number marked on the right side of the receiver leg was initially “IHC D6528291,” which was later changed to “D6528291” without the “IHC” prefix. The primary components, including the bolt, operating rod, trigger housing, hammer, gas cylinder lock screw and rear sight’s windage and elevation knobs, were generally marked “IHC” along with the appropriate drawing number and/or subcontractor initials. Although they weren’t marked, most of the IHC front sights had a noticeably wider space between the two flared protective “ears”—approximately 0.875 inches across, as compared to the other manufacturers. RELATED STORY: Winter War Fighter – The Mosin-Nagant M/28-30 Although it was originally planned for IHC to manufacture the rifle stocks and handguards in-house, it was determined that these components should be made by subcontractors, mainly the S.E. Overton Company. Interestingly, IHC stocks had numbers (normally four digits) stamped in the barrel channel. These numbers are believed to represent a variation of the Julian dating system. No other manufacturer utilized such numbers. Another feature of the IHC stocks was the narrower profile behind the receiver heel as compared to the H&R stocks. There were several variants of stock inspection stamps used, including a “crossed cannon” escutcheon, but by late 1953, the familiar 0.5-inch Defense Acceptance Stamp came into use. Eventually, IHC accepted production contracts totaling 418,443 M1 rifles. Unfortunately for the company, IHC’s parent company sold the Evansville property to the Whirlpool Corporation in September 1955. To make matters worse, the contract called for Whirlpool to take possession of the plant just four months later. Although IHC had manufactured slightly over 300,000 rifles by this time, it would have been impossible for the firm to build the remaining 100,000 in such a short period. This resulted in the company having to negotiate an early termination of the final contract. Despite the trials and tribulations encountered, IHC eventually manufactured over 337,000 M1 rifles by the time it ceased production in December 1955. Scattered Surplus Prior to the late 1970s, IHC M1s were rather hard to find on the domestic civilian market as compared to those made by other manufacturers. In the late 1950s and into the 1960s, many late-production Garands, especially those from Springfield Armory and IHC, were shipped to various allied countries. While some H&R Garands were also shipped to some overseas allies, most of these rifles were from IHC. RELATED STORY: Trench Warrior – The Pedersen Device Once the rifles were supplied to foreign governments, they could not be “re-imported” back into the United States for sale on the civilian market. Between 1977 and 1978, a loophole in the regulations permitted some of these former military rifles to be brought back to the U.S., but sales were restricted to full-time law enforcement officers. Quite a few rifles changed hands in this manner, and in just a few years, IHC-made M1 Garands became a bit easier to find. The regulations were eventually tightened up to prohibit such sales. However, a few years later, the Director of Civilian Marksmanship and its successor, the Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP), acquired fair numbers of Garands, including some IHC models, from overseas and these were sold on the civilian market to qualified buyers. The CMP periodically has IHC Garands available for sale. They are among the bestselling guns sold by the CMP and are highly sought after by collectors due to the interesting receiver variations and the smaller number of rifles made as compared to those manufactured by Springfield Armory. The story of the International Harvester Garand is yet another example of how America’s civilian manufacturers assisted the nation when called upon to make badly needed weaponry. This article was originally published in ‘Military Surplus’ #188. For information on how to subscribe, please email subscriptions@outdoorgroupmags.com or call 1-800-284-5668. The post International Harvester’s Post-WWII M1 Garand Rifles appeared first on Tactical Life Gun Magazine: Gun News and Gun Reviews. Continue reading...
  12. The residents of an assisted living facility in Marietta, Georgia were treated to a surprise visit by Georgia Army National Guard soldiers on Tuesday, all of whom stopped by to spread a little holiday cheer. RELATED STORY: 14 Non-Traditional ‘Tactical’ Stocking Stuffers “We wanted to do something to give back to the community,” said Lt. Col. Alexander McLemore, director of logistics for the Georgia Army National Guard. “Rather than conduct an office gift exchange, the Soldiers decided to take gifts for others.” Those gifts included slippers, warm socks, blankets and home-baked cookies for the residents at Azalea Manor, the Army says. Adding to the good vibes, they also sang Christmas carols, and even sang happy birthday to one resident who had just turned 85. The National Guard soldiers also played multiple rounds of Bingo with the residents. “This was the perfect opportunity for us to make a difference,” said Sgt 1st Class Maurika Flores, a budget analyst with the Georgia Army National Guard Directorate of Logistics who was one of 20 soldiers to visit with the residents earlier this week. These Guardsmen came from Clay National Guard Center, which houses the Guard’s Joint Force Headquarters and two of its brigades. RELATED STORY: 10 Must-Have Airguns For the Holiday Season A majority of soldiers who went to the assisted living facility have deployed overseas, and many more than once. It’s safe to say this Christmas visit to Azalea Manor did them some good. “Honestly, I don’t know who benefited more from this visit, the residents or our Soldiers,” McLemore said. The post Georgia Army National Guard Brings Holiday Cheer to the Elderly appeared first on Tactical Life Gun Magazine: Gun News and Gun Reviews. Continue reading...
  13. When we think of Christmas, we think of Santa Claus, presents under the tree, and John McClane (Bruce Willis) running amok inside the Nakatomi Building as a dozen terrorists try to kill him before he foils their plans. Surely, nothing says “Christmas” more than the 1988 movie “Die Hard.” RELATED STORY: 13 Iconic Horror Movie Guns For Halloween 2016 Throughout the film, the terrorists, led by Hans Gruber (Alan Rickman), showcase an impressive arsenal that scene-by-scene destroy different parts of Nakatomi Plaza. RELATED STORY: 7 Guns Used in ’13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi’ Scroll through the gallery above — courtesy of the Internet Movie Firearms Database — for our seven favorite firearms used in “Die Hard.” And for those of you who don’t think “Die Hard” is the greatest Christmas movie of all time, please see the clip below: The post Ho-Ho-Ho: 7 of the Best Guns From the Movie ‘Die Hard’ appeared first on Tactical Life Gun Magazine: Gun News and Gun Reviews. Continue reading...
  14. When GQ reporter Ashley Fetter set out to write “Why Women Own Guns,” it demonstrated how uniformed most reporters are about firearms. I tackled the article here on Bearing Arms, and joined Cam Edwards on Cam&Co to discuss. The post NRA News: Jacques Goes GQ with Cam Edwards appeared first on Bearing Arms. Continue reading...
  15. BALTIMORE (AP) – Baltimore police say a private investigator shot a 13-year-old boy who opened his car door and brandished what turned out to be a replica gun. Police say the 73-year-old investigator, a former city police officer, was sitting in his car Wednesday afternoon in southwest Baltimore when a group of young men approached. When the 13-year-old boy opened the car door and displayed what appeared to be a handgun, police say the man shot him. The others fled. The teen was taken to Shock Trauma, where police say he was in critical condition. Police say the investigator was interviewed by detectives. Police say he was a police officer in the 1960s and 1970s and has a valid concealed weapon permit issued by Maryland State Police. The post Baltimore Private Investigator Shoots Teen Displaying Fake Gun appeared first on Bearing Arms. Continue reading...
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