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Did Bill's Rape Accuser Convince Hillary That Sexual Assault Victims No Longer Have A...

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Hillary has been fairly adamant throughout her campaign that sexual assault victims have the "right to be heard" and the "right to be believed." Well it seems that her own Husband's sexual assault accuser might be altering her stance on this issue...at least on the "right to be believed" part. As pointed out by an article in BuzzFeedNews, Clinton has shifted her language on the rights of sexual assault victims as Bill's accuser, Juanita Broaddrick has become more vocal.

 

In September 2015, Hillary's view on the issue was pretty clear per the following tweet:

 

"To every survivor of sexual assault...You have the right to be heard. You have the right to be believed. We're with you." —Hillary

 

— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton)

 

 

 

In November 2015, Hillary reiterated with another tweet:

 

Every survivor of sexual assault deserves to be heard, believed, and supported.

 

— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton)

 

 

 

But then everything changed in January 2016 when Juanita Broaddrick had finally had enough and posted the following tweet of her own:

 

I was 35 years old when Bill Clinton, Ark. Attorney General raped me and Hillary tried to silence me. I am now 73....it never goes away.

 

— Juanita Broaddrick (@atensnut)

 

 

 

Seems this tweet carried enough weight for the Hillary camp to reassess whether all sexual assault victims have the "right to be believed." When later confronted by reporters about whether her husband's accusers, like Juanita Broaddrick, had a "right to be believed," Hillary replied, “Well, I would say that everybody should be believed at first until they are disbelieved based on evidence.”

 

As BuzzFeed points out, the Hillary camp seemingly went a step further and modified their website after the Broaddrick tweet to amend a Hillary quote made on September 14, 2015. As can be seen below, the February 2016 version of the website removes the sentence "You have the right to be believed, and we're with you." Perhaps she just thought there was no longer enough space on the site for that line?

 

Here is a snapshot of Hillary's website in September 2015, before the Broaddrick tweet, including the sentence:

 

Hillary%20Wayback%2011-30_1_0.JPG

 

 

 

And another snapshot from February 2016, after the Broaddrick tweet, where the sentence had been removed:

 

Hillary%20Wayback%202-4_0.JPG

 

 

 

Of course, Hillary's full comments are preserved in the original "Message to Survivors of Sexual Assault":

 

 

For those not familiar with Juanita Broaddrick's story, below is a summary from BuzzFeed:

 

Broaddrick, then 35, first met Bill Clinton when he was 31 and the attorney general of Arkansas, during a campaign stop he made at her nursing home. They discussed her business and his campaign — Broaddrick wasn’t much into politics, but she had recently started volunteering for him with a friend — and Clinton told Broaddrick to call his office if she was ever in nearby Little Rock. A few weeks later, she did just that while attending a nursing seminar there. They arranged to meet one morning in the coffee shop in the hotel where the seminar was held. At the last second, Clinton called up to Broaddrick’s room and asked if they could meet there instead, since there were reporters in the lobby below. She said yes. Minutes after entering her room, he tried to kiss her, she says, biting her upper lip, hard.

 

 

 

Shocked, Broaddrick says, she resisted Clinton, even telling him she was not only married, but having an affair with another man (who would later become her second husband). He ignored her, she says, and pushed her on the bed and raped her. Afterward, she says, he put his sunglasses on and told her to get some ice for her swollen lips before leaving the room.

 

 

 

“There was no remorse,” Broaddrick told me. “He acted like it was an everyday occurrence. He was not the least bit apologetic. It was just unreal.” She rushed to the door and locked it, she says, afraid that someone would come back in to kill her.

 

 

 

Two of Broaddrick’s friends who had also attended the nursing conference found Broaddrick in tears, her lips swollen and blue. She told them what had happened but made them swear not to tell anyone else. She was scared of retaliation, didn’t think anyone would believe her, and blamed herself for allowing Clinton to come up to her room.

 

 

 

“I had never known anybody that had been raped,” she told me. “I could not imagine anybody that could get in that situation and not get out of it.”

 

 

 

Soon after, Broaddrick says, she ran into Hillary Clinton at a political rally Broaddrick had promised friends she would attend. Hillary shook her hand and thanked her for everything she had done for Bill. To Broaddrick, the gesture felt like a threat to stay silent.

 

 

 

Broaddrick says Bill Clinton called her a few times after the assault but she never picked up. Aside from a letter his governor’s office sent her when she won a nursing home award in 1984 — Clinton scrawled “I admire you very much” on the bottom — the next time she heard from him was in 1991, when, she claims, he confronted her in person to apologize. She wondered what had caused the change of heart. Soon after, he announced he was running for president.

 

Juanita's full interview with Dateline about her encounter with then Arkansas Attorney General Bill Clinton can be viewed below:

 

 

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